Early rumblings in 2019 local government elections


The first rumbles of the 2019 local government elections are starting to reverberate through the political landscape of New Zealand local government. Although the main campaign period is some months away, it has not stopped several notable local politicians from announcing they are standing Mayor.

In Auckland, former Labour Member of Parliament John Tamihere has announced his intention to stand against incumbent Mayor of Auckland and one time Minister of Justice, Phil Goff. Mr Tamihere proposes to open up the council finances to Aucklanders so that they are able to better see where their rate payer dollars are going.

Further south in Christchurch, incumbent Mayor Lianne Dalziel has announced that she will stand for a third term in office. Ms Dalziel secured the mayoralty in 2013 after much of the Christchurch City Council was voted out following a controversy – and disaster ridden – second term by the then Mayor Bob Parker. During her tenure, Councillor Raf Manji has rebalanced the council books which showed serious flaws, including considerably under-estimating the value of Christchurch’s assets when filing a claim with the insurance companies over earthquake damage.

Also possibly standing for Mayor is Councillor Jamie Gough, linked to businessman Anthony Gough who was one of the major private players in the dividing up of C.B.D. land. Mr Gough’s decision to announce a possible stand was in part informed by the growth of council projects that amount to unnecessary expenditure, but also a need to rein in rates.

However, since then, a tendency by the council to embark on projects that do have necessarily have sufficient or appropriate rate payer support, has resulted in much criticism being laid. They include a current plan to redesign Riccarton Road to have a traffic island with green space down the middle, unnecessary arts installations around the city including random steel sculptures set in the middle of the Avon River. Also planned is what I call an arty farty design around the perimeter of Cathedral Square which in my opinion do nothing for it.

Worryingly for some districts where the population base is quite tiny, a person can stand for council and get in simply because in their ward there might not be anyone else standing. Such a situation to me suggests two things:

  1. Local Government politics are simply not worth most peoples time
  2. Perhaps these small districts whose population base in some cases is only a few thousand should be looking at being dissolved into their neighbouring districts

In other councils such as Westland District Council, which has been rocked by scandal, rate payers will be looking forward to enacting a change of guard. The W.D.C., which in 2016 was made to admit that it had hired a company that bakes cakes to do work on a waste treatment plant in Franz Josef, that due hiring processes had not been followed. All of this which resulted in multiple high profile departures

Watch this space as we move further into 2019 and other potential candidates put their hands up to be a on a local board, council or even mayor.

 

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.