Rejection of application to assess Franz Josef shows lack of understanding


The Minister for Regional Development Shane Jones has rejected an application to assess the suitability of Franz Josef for relocation. The rejection of the application, which came in the wake of destructive floods in March and growing concerns about its safety in an Alpine Fault earthquake, indicates a lack of understanding about the dangers posed to the popular West Coast township.

My main concern is that this will unnecessarily increase the risk to residents and visitors to the township. All residents and visitors have a right to be safe in the township during an emergency event, that structures and natural features have been subject to an E.I.M. assessment and matching appropriate steps have been taken:

  • E is ELIMINATE – ELIMINATE the hazard, whether it securing the parapets, chimneys of buildings to make sure they do not collapse onto the street or into adjacent buildigns
  • I is ISOLATE – ISOLATE is what gets done when a hazard cannot be eliminated, requires the separation of the hazardous feature and possibly a buffer zone around it to contain it if still dangerous
  • M is MINIMISE – MINIMISE the hazard if it cannot be ELIMINATED or ISOLATED, by diverting, removing or stopping all non essential functions/features/activities in the vicinity of the hazard

We cannot ELIMINATE the Alpine Fault and the Waiho River. We cannot ISOLATE their reach in Franz Josef’s current location. MINIMISING the risk by relocation off the probable area of the fault scarp and the active Waiho River bed is the best way of reducing the likely damage. The town would be immediately and violently subject to any Alpine Fault earthquake with massive disruption of power, water and sewerage, road and telecommunication links. A fault scarp possibly 2-5 metres high would rupture right through the township with 8 metres or more lateral displacement. The only thing therefore to do is either move all of the non-essential infrastructure of the township away from its current location and establish somewhere else or move the whole town. Neither option is going to be cheap and will probably result in having to buy up land somewhere.

One has to accept that there will still be considerable damage in Franz Josef even if it does get moved. However infrastructure will be far more quickly repaired. It will be spared the likely landslide dam burst emergency that would occur in the Callery River catchment immediately upstream of the Waiho River bridge. And most importantly it would be spared the massive ground damage that would be caused by the surface rupture and which alone would take months to begin to repair – if at all.

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