About robglennie000

Kia Ora This blog is my vent for releasing my frustrations with the state of New Zealand, the New Zealand Government and things going on in New Zealand society, as well as around the world. I post daily at 0900 New Zealand time. Please feel free to leave comments. Please also feel free to follow my blog. Best Regards, Rob

52nd Parliament of New Zealand ends


It is over. The 52nd New Zealand Parliament formally ended yesterday. In a Parliamentary term that has had volcanic eruption, a terrorist attack, a pandemic, a colossal National Party melt down and a cocktail of scandals showing the worst of “Parliamentarians behaving badly”, the headline makers have had a field day. We have seen some good policy, some bad policy; good ministerial work (Kris Faafoi in Civil Defence) and bad ministerial work (David Clark). But as we head into the election campaign period, both National and Labour are chilling on policy.

This sudden chill on policy bothers me. Maybe both parties are stalling for time because they have been so wrapped up in COVID19 issues that they simply have not gotten around to thinking about decent policy – there have been suggestions by the conspiracy theorists that Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern might postpone or even cancel the election on COVID19 related grounds. These are clearly whack ideas from people with either little clue on how democracy works, or perhaps more sinisterly, they want to spread disinformation to invoke fear in the public.

Our constitutional laws require that we hold an election in 2020. There is no reason for the Government not to. Every Government wants to say that it won the election fair and square. Right now the election is Labour’s to lose. Cruising in the polls with Ms Ardern being the most popular Labour Prime Minister in modern times, they have every reason to want to have the election. So, where is the policy? Or are you suggesting we take up Bryce Edwards idea of postponing the election?

In the case of National the complete lack of decent policy can be in part traced to the party’s massive meltdown. Roads, roading, and more roads seem to be the only coherent policy that National have at the moment, which is bad news for a party wanting to spend only one term on the Opposition benches. One might have thought that even if it is a relatively typical National Party policy something might have been said about justice, defence, education, health, conservation and so forth. But as yet other than leader Judith Collins attacking Labour for having little policy, the silence is notable.

Labour are less explicable. With an election to lose I honestly thought they would be talking about a Labour legacy based on a mandate that they might not have again for 25-30 years. In building that legacy I thought comprehensive policy changes in at least one or more of the following areas might be on the way: social welfare, health, education, justice, and so forth.

I am sure many New Zealanders will have noted Ms Ardern’s comments about not expecting much big policy with some surprise and perhaps a bit of confusion. The dissertation by Thomas Coughlan on this matter a couple of days ago was comprehensive and should be pause for thought among all New Zealanders. Elections are meant to be as Mr Coughlan notes, a contest of ideas. They are not meant to be the partisan bitching contests that the recent ones have devolved into. The faster both parties realize this and start putting out some decent policy for me to debate with mates over beers in the coming weeks, the better.

Australian COVID19 woes a warning to New Zealand


For most of the last three months, New Zealand has literally been in a world of its own. Whilst other countries have partially recovered from COVID19 and are trying to get back to something approaching normal in a post-COVID world, New Zealand has dialled back to being an almost normal society in terms of every day activities. Whilst the country is keeping a watching brief on what is happening around the world, the very business premises here that are struggling to open in most other countries are enjoying a surprisingly strong revival. A domestic market that is determined to make up for lost time is also seeking to rejuvenate itself, having been squeezed by international demand, that has effectively dried up.

At a time when there are wannabe political parties who think COVID19 is a scam and that New Zealanders are falling for it, the Australian state of Victoria has entered a complete lock down with only essential services able to function. Much like the New Zealand lock down, all bars, cinema’s, leisure complexes, shopping malls are closed until at least some point in September. And last night I heard that New South Wales has closed its border with Queensland as well as its previously closed border with Victoria.

Clearly Australia is losing control of COVID19. 726 new cases were announced in Victoria just yesterday, which about 40% of all the cases of COVID19 ever announced in New Zealand. This means that the border is likely to remain firmly shut for the indefinite future. It also puts in serious jeopardy the idea of a trans-Tasman bubble or a south Pacific bubble with our smaller island neighbours such as Tonga, Fiji and Samoa.

The danger is real. Given the explosive growth of case numbers in Victoria, it would only take a small number of people testing positive without entering quarantine to bring back the virus to New Zealand. Australia has 18,728 vs 1,569; 10,000+ recovered vs 1,523; 232 dead compared to 22. But whereas New Zealand went as an entire nation from one level to the next, Australia has been acting state by state when perhaps there is a case for the Federal Government to move the country as a whole.

New Zealand should be watching what is happening in Australia with great wariness. Whereas Australia has greater resources at state and Federal level to tap we do not. New Zealand also has to be mindful of the fact that for many parts of the world we are the gateway to Polynesia and Melanesia, parts of the world that have almost no defences against COVID19 and which could – in the case of very small island states like Wallis and Futuna, be completely wiped out. Neither we – and certainly not they – can afford for this to happen.

 

National has no big ideas; Labour says not to expect big ideas


National are bereft of ideas. Labour are saying not to expect big ideas. So, then what is the 2020 General Election going to be about then?

That is it. That is the article for today.

Your assignment – should you take it up – is to tell what THREE (3) policies you want to see passed.

Parliament enters its final week with chaos on both sides of the House


Perhaps never in recent times has the New Zealand Parliament arrived in the final week of a term with so much party chaos. A Opposition wracked by internal strife and unable to follow its own rules; a coalition barely hanging together by the thinnest of threads and an election 6 weeks away. But here we are in August 2020 with just such a scene.

Just when one thought National’s disastrous 2020 could not get worse, the Party has admitted breaking its own rules. In the mad scramble to find a replacement for outgoing Auckland Central M.P. Nikki Kaye, the party misused a clause in its candidate selection process. With ten candidates wanting to line up as the replacement, with a minimum of five being allowed to ensure a decent selection, only two candidates were originally permitted. Perhaps more embarrassing for National was the burst of misogyny from its own members that accompanied this latest revelation. Apparently unable or unwilling to get their heads around Nuwanthie Samarakone’s prior history as a ballet dancer an image of her in a leotard has been circulated among party members with derogatory commentary.

Without doubt there must be many in the party who cannot wait for the election to be over and done with. Some might even be wanting the party they love to take a bit of a pasting as a measure of tough love, whilst still more might be uneasily eyeing A.C.T. as the potential beneficiary of their party vote. A.C.T., a one man band in Epsom is looking at its best performance since 2008 when it brought five M.P.’s to Parliament.

Regarding the coalition, Henry Cooke probably could not have put it better: a car near the end of a journey falling to bits with the driver concentrating on the road ahead, whilst the passengers have a noisy fist fight.

New Zealand First need to grow up and focus on the fact that their house is not in apple pie order. As Tracey Martin put it in a recent interview with Andrea Vance the party had clay feet in 2008 when it was turfed from Parliament and the Party had three weeks to clear out of the Parliamentary precinct. Unfortunately she did not note based on the continuing emission of smoke, regarding allegations of improper donations and other financial improprieties which have been burning all year, that the party has equally clay feet in dealing with them.

But there is a bigger problem. Is it just possible that after 36 years, and 11 terms in Parliament, New Zealand has finally had enough of Winston Peters? Is it just possible that the swing towards Labour is in part a nod to the fact that for real social progress to happen, New Zealand needs to overhaul its taxes in ways New Zealand  First is steadfastly opposed to? It is not impossible.

But of the Green Party? Oh fricking dearie me. What have we here? A party that through a dose of ineptitude and a completely disinterested media has completely

And through all this, perhaps because she can see the finish line, or perhaps because Labour are on a nearly unprecedented roll at the moment, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern is somehow managing to ignore the disintegrating state of the car and the back seat fist fight. One more week of Parliament, if she can just get the coalition to stay together for one more week….

 

Crack down on exploitation of migrant workers needed


In 2016 I wrote an article about the the need to stop the exploitation of migrants to New Zealand. It came at a time when the then Prime Minister of New Zealand John Key was in India to talk free trade. I lamented the loss of the opportunity Mr Key had to talk to his Indian counterpart Narendra Modi about the exploitation of Indian workers here.

In 2018, I wrote another. This time it was about Filipino workers being exploited. In their case the agency that handled their visa had taken the money they paid – in the thousands of dollars – and disappeared.

This supposedly fair New Zealand is – to put it politely – pussy footing around the issue of exploitation of migrant workers. Surprisingly, despite the potential harm it will cause New Zealand when exploited workers go home with tales of abuse and how they were poorly treated by the authorities, neither of the major political parties seem to be dreadfully interested in reform.

The Labour Inspectorate is a toothless tiger in the instance of Ravi Arora, an Indian businessman who owns a several liquor stores around New Zealand, a $3.6 million house and has $36 million assets including two motels. Mr Arora has also racked up an extensive list of complaints from workers who allege exploitation under New Zealand labour laws. Despite 19 investigations, he continues to run businesses

I have no doubt that unless Mr Arora is either arrested or deported he will continue to set up, or acquire, liquor businesses so that he can continue to engage in exploitative practices. The fact that Mr Arora has offloaded business interests to avoid being linked to further exploitation claims, that he is using his wife as a contact tells me he has no qualms about the illegal nature of what he is engaging in.

Mr Arora is not the the only person who has been found wanting in their treatment of migrant workers in New Zealand. Mohan Reddy who owns liquor stores in Auckland was found wanting in 2019 over the treatment of seven migrant workers.

However not all is lost. The Government is working on law changes that will assist exploited workers in leaving their jobs with repercussions, clamp down on rogues and disqualify those convicted of exploitation from being directors or managers of a company.

It remains to be seen whether the coming law changes will have any real impact on the offenders as they are largely related to helping the victims of the exploitation. This is obviously fair enough, except that a strong clear message needs to be sent to those in a position to employ people that New Zealand expects better from its business owners than what the likes of Mr Reddy and Mr Arora have been prepared to offer their exploited staff.

It is not okay to exploit people in New Zealand. People who move here thinking that because they could get away with improper practices in their country of origin need to understand that New Zealand authorities are for the most part not corrupt. And New Zealanders as a general rule, have an expectation that this will be understood and respected.